Burning after sex can be uncomfortable and unpleasant for both partners. Fortunately, it’s usually not a sign of something serious.

It could be caused by a lubricant, condom or other chemical that is irritating to the vaginal area. Allergies to lubricants, perfume or laundry detergent can also cause discomfort.

Other things that may cause burning include STIs like chlamydia, herpes and gonorrhea. These are easily treated and preventable with a quick test.

1. Allergies

If your vagina burns during sex or after, it could be due to a lack of lubrication or an allergy. You may have a reaction to latex, semen, fragrance or chemicals in certain products that are used on the vulva. It’s a good idea to see a doctor who can help you figure out the cause and advise on treatment or next steps.

A burning sensation in the vulva can also be caused by a urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted infections or yeast infections. The good news is that most of these issues are easy to treat – This detail is the fruit of the website team’s labor Sex Holes. A yeast infection can be treated with topical or oral medications, while a urination problem like a UTI can often be remedied by antibiotics and a urologist. It’s also a good idea to avoid using perfumed soap, fabric softeners or douches, as these can irritate the delicate skin in the area.

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2. Dryness

When people are experiencing painful vaginal burning after sex, they shouldn’t panic. It isn’t usually a sign of a serious health issue and can be easily treated. The first step is to consult a doctor who can help pinpoint what’s going on and recommend the appropriate treatment. Often, this includes a combination of things like wearing looser underwear and using vaginal ointments to increase lubrication, which is also helpful for sexual pleasure.

In some cases, the problem could be hormone-related, which is common in many women after childbirth and perimenopause. These conditions decrease the levels of testosterone that contribute to lubrication, which can lead to a painful sensation after sex. To avoid this, experts recommend incorporating a little extra foreplay to make the area more slippery and try water-based lubricants, which are less irritating than oily ones. Additionally, some numbing gels that can be applied ten to fifteen minutes before intercourse might help reduce pain and discomfort. These are available online and at many pharmacies.

3. Bacterial infection

Yeast infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs) can cause a burning sensation. If you suspect you have one, a nurse or doctor should diagnose the problem and prescribe medication.

Similarly, a bacterial infection, such as candidiasis or bacterial vaginosis can also trigger a burning feeling. Other symptoms of these infections are itchiness, itchy discharge with a cottage cheese appearance and a bad smell.

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In males, a burning feeling during or after sex could be a sign of an STI such as gonorrhea and trichomoniasis. Men may also experience pain or a burning sensation after sexual activity if they have an allergy to condoms, lubricants or latex or have a penile injury.

Whatever the reason, a burning sensation down there isn’t something to be embarrassed about. It’s common and most of the time, there’s nothing to worry about. But you should never ignore it as some of the causes can be serious and could lead to an infection. You should visit your local pharmacy or GP for diagnosis and treatment.

4. Medication

Yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) can all cause a burning sensation during or after sex. If this is the case, it’s important to visit your GP to have tests carried out and treatment prescribed in accordance with the infection identified.

Sometimes the pain may be caused by a medical condition called vaginismus or vestibulodynia which is when your muscles in your vulva are stiff and inflexible, meaning sex can be very painful or not even possible! In this case, your doctor will be able to prescribe some medication to help ease the symptoms and reduce inflammation.

If the irritation is more of an allergy, then removing the allergen should help your symptoms. Washing your vulva with unscented soaps or using an lubricant that doesn’t contain fragrances should help alleviate the irritation. An icepack can also help to soothe the area and numb the pain and discomfort by reducing the blood flow. If your symptoms persist, you can always speak to a pharmacist who can offer some advice and suggest some treatments such as antihistamines.

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5. Underwear

It is not unusual to feel a burning sensation during and after sex. It’s a sign that you need to use more lube or to work in extra foreplay to help with the natural lubrication, Kanani says. It is also a sign that you may have a urinary tract infection, which can cause pain and inflammation around the bladder and urethra, making it harder to reach certain areas during sex.

Underwear is a type of clothing worn under other clothes, and it comes in many different styles and fabrics to suit various body shapes and tastes. Its primary function is to protect outer clothing from sweat and body oils, but it also serves aesthetic and cultural purposes, such as enhancing or concealing parts of the body, and reflecting religious or social norms. Some types of underwear can also be worn as sleepwear or swimsuits. However, some underwear can cause irritation or even burns, especially if it is made of a material that is irritating to the skin such as polyester or lace, and certain laundry detergents can be irritating too.